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We’ll Go Under That Bridge When We Get to It

Greenfield Bridge, part of a boulevard that never quite was

Far more people traveled under the Greenfield Bridge before it disappeared Monday than ever traveled over it. That isn’t what was envisioned when it opened 92 years ago.

It was supposed to be part of a landscaped thoroughfare making travel through the city a leisurely experience in the wondrous age of automobiles.  Therein is the story of Beechwood Boulevard, the longest convoluted street in a city of many, and a romantic vision that ultimately made Pittsburgh more livable.

If you drive through Squirrel Hill, you may wonder why the boulevard meanders so much without changing names. It is because a century ago, Beechwood went on a growth spree, trying to sidle up to every recently created park it could reach.

Many cities developed similar park-oriented roads at that time. Some called them, get this . .  parkways. We’ll get back to that.

An art commission reviewed the design for the Beechwood Boulevard bridge at Greenfield.  The commission wanted to ensure it would appeal to what were called Sunday drivers, those out for recreational cruises.

It approved a graceful arching concrete expanse. Drivers would be culturally elevated by beauty, and relieved not to crash into the valley below. That came close to happening

The wood structure it replaced, sometimes called the Schenley Park Bridge, was falling down, falling down. City Photographer pictures dated  1909 show a major effort underway to jack the bridge up and get its sliding feet firmly replanted on the hillsides.

Photos dated 1921 show a splintered debris field across the valley. A “Closed Bridge Sign” teetering over one edge indicated the span had already been closed when it fell.

Not that it would have hit much.  Down below,  you would not see cars sitting six abreast and motoring impatience rising with the fumes. There was just unpaved Forward Avenue and Four Mile Run lazily tracing the bottom of the ravine.

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